Situation report on ar Raqqa Syria

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The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) campaign to retake areas of ar Raqqa governorate currently under ISIS control has been ongoing since November 2016. The operation is supported by US-led airstrikes.

As of end-May, over 205,000 had been displaced. Internally displaced persons (IDPs) residing in organized camps and makeshift settlements have irregular access to food, drinking water, and sanitation facilities, as well as health services. Anecdotal evidence suggests similar needs among those still in ISIS-held ar Raqqa city.

In the coming months the additional caseload of people that will require humanitarian assistance in ar Raqqa and surrounding governorates is projected to reach 440,000, including 340,000 people newly displaced and 100,000 people estimated in Raqqa city currently. The increasing number of people in need will no doubt put a strain on current capacities.

Moreover, widespread fighting and airstrikes are likely to damage or destroy vital civilian infrastructure, such as health centers, water towers and pumping stations, and power stations, thereby making needs more acute.

[Relief Web]

This entry was posted in by Grant Montgomery.

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